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Springetts Brand Design Consultants

Case Studies

Armstead

Client

AkzoNobel

Project Launch Date

May 2014

DBA Design Effectiveness Award Winner

Design Disciplines

  • Branding
  • Graphic
  • Other
  • Packaging

Industry Sector

  • Construction and property

Summary

This is a story about how a brand died and how we created a new one to phoenix-like, rise from the ashes. Our job was to create a completely new one that could replace it without losing any sales and act as a platform for future growth.

Problem

Our design objectives:
• Identify a differentiated and compelling position in the 2nd tier
• Create a new brand name, positioning, logo, pack design, and tone of voice
• Create design that didn’t alienate existing Glidden users and lose current share.
• Be clearly competitive
• Leverage the strength of AkzoNobel endorsement, and use the opportunity to complement Dulux Trade

Approach

We explored hundreds of names that suggested our desired personality - reliable, grounded, uncomplicated, a savvy team player. Our shortlist was brought to life with designs around the names and researched.

There were a number of strong contenders but Armstead was our winner. The name suggested strength and reliability, a feeling that quality is built-in. Yet there’s an easy informality about it. It wouldn’t challenge a decorator. There’s no need to explain the choice of paint brand. In a market full of function it looks and sounds reliable and well established.

The A looks robust and firm like a decorator’s ladder; the arm with closed fist denotes strength and confidence. The dark blue A with silver pin-striping looks best in class not basic!

Result

The Armstead brand successfully replaced Glidden with NO lost volume. Armstead’s presence in-store was so arresting that it was easy for contracting decorators to choose it instead of Glidden and not be lulled into competing brands (despite heavy discounting activity by them!).

Volume sales were maintained in the launch year and grew volume in 2015.

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Goodlife

Client

Goodlife Foods

Project Launch Date

October 2014

Design Disciplines

  • Branding
  • Graphic
  • Packaging

Industry Sector

  • Food and drink

Summary

To relaunch the brand with a complete update and re-positioning, encompassing all consumer and retail touchpoints from its packaging and POS to web, social media and experiential activity and to transform the brand from ‘vegetarian meals for vegetarians’ to ‘great tasting food made with vegetables’ that everyone can enjoy.

Problem

Our main challenge was that Goodlife’s product range not only appealed to a niche market but the brand itself was perceived as a niche player within that market. So we had to relaunch the brand with a complete update and re-positioning, encompassing all consumer and retail touchpoints from its packaging and POS to web, social media and experiential activity. We wanted to transform the brand from ‘vegetarian meals for vegetarians’ to ‘great tasting food made with vegetables’ that everyone can enjoy.


Approach

The main barrier to purchase was the perceived lack of taste and sustenance of frozen meat-free meals. This prejudice was also in part real, as the products in the market often failed to deliver on appetite appeal. Given Goodlife’s passion for creating delicious veg-based meat-free meals, this was a massive opportunity to push against an open door.

We developed a unique and compelling brand proposition: ‘inspiringly vegtastic food’ which informed both the product and brand development programme.

The design idea seeks to make ‘veg the hero’, creating a stacked visual architecture showcasing all the ingredients that go into the delicious products. The vegetable ingredients cascade down from the Goodlife logo, which, with creative love and care, turn into ‘vegelicious’ products.

The naïve execution of the ingredients and hand-drawn type adds an air of natural integrity and honesty to the product. The stacked robust slab-serif typeface enhances the feeling of sustenance.

The colour palette was chosen to accentuate the foodiness of the products and the rich earthy tones add a rustic charm that harks back to simpler times when things were naturally tasty and trigger semiotic cues of abundance and hearty generosity.

The unconventional vertical pack format stands out on shelf. It was a real achievement to get the retailers to adopt this format and so successful do they think it is, they have required it of other brands in the freezer.

Result

It is too early for rate of sale data on the re-branded portfolio but it has resulted in 3 additional listings of the full range in both Waitrose and Ocado. It has also secured increased listings in Booths and the Co-op and has had fantastic response from upmarket independents and farm shops.


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Monty Bojangles

Client

The Monty Bojangles Company

Project Launch Date

September 2014

Design Disciplines

  • Branding
  • Graphic
  • Packaging

Industry Sector

  • Food and drink

Summary

To relaunch the Monty Bojangles truffle brand and increase listings.

Problem

How do you create a brand story around a modern chocolatier, quirky truffle flavours and the non-negotiable usage of the family cat named Monty Bojangles?

Approach

We explored ideas around the saying ‘curiosity killed the cat’ a proverb used to warn of the dangers of unnecessary investigation or experimentation. We changed the proverb to ‘curiosity thrilled the cat’ (as we felt it a little harsh to kill off the family cat so soon in the creative process) and created a brand story where our hero’s curiosity sets him out on exciting ‘taste adventures’.

The next challenge was creating a personality for Monty. A character we felt most summed up our hero was Michael Palin – the link to Monty Python was also helpful later in the process – the quirky curious British traveller abroad, also of Ripping Yarns fame, was the perfect role model for Monty.

The world we created came from the Monty Python link and Terry Gilliam’s wonderful animated creations. We echoed his mix of hand-painted crafting with found irreverent antique photographs, mixed with a more vibrant modern palette, to create a visual world that became as exciting as the chocolates themselves.

A tone of voice for the brand around ‘the curious adventures of Monty Bojangles’ set the quirky tones for the packaging and product names - ‘Choccy Scoffy’, etc. - all of which become curiously moreish.

We not only gave Monty a starring role in the brand but connected him to the reason to believe in the chocolates’ difference to the competition around the simple idea of curiosity and seeking new tastes.

Result

The new packaging gained lisstings in Co-op, Tesco, Waitrose, Morrisons and a number of selected high street retailers.

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The Happy Egg Co.

Client

Noble Foods

Project Launch Date

January 2009

DBA Design Effectiveness Award Winner

Design Disciplines

  • Branding
  • Graphic
  • Packaging

Industry Sector

  • Food and drink

Summary

To invent a brand for Noble Foods that could inject new life into the largely unbranded, low interest egg category.

Problem

The egg category was in long term decline, the market was predominantly own label leaving the fixture cluttered and confusing. Other core commodity categories such as butter and milk had brands that add value - why not eggs?

Approach

We developed a brand proposition based on Noble Foods' animal husbandry - happy hens lay the tastiest eggs. From this point the brand name was developed - the happy egg co. The subsequent design was created to deliver a new attitude to eggs for consumers. A distinctive design that cut through the confusion of the free range fixture and made consumer choice easier.

Result

• A brand that is driving 75% of the total free-range growth.
• Will more than meet its 2-year brand value target.
• Is listed in all major multiples and convenience outlets.
• Had 24% prompted awareness in first year.

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Twickenham Fine Ales

Client

Twickenham Fine Ales

Project Launch Date

September 2013

DBA Design Effectiveness Award Winner

Design Disciplines

  • Branding
  • Graphic
  • Packaging

Industry Sector

  • Food and drink
  • Hospitality

Summary

The real ale market had been in steady decline, to some extent self-inflicted, with multi-nationals producing mass-produced product driven by cost-cutting and accelerated production techniques. Together, of course, with Britain’s new love of lager. This was the catalyst behind the foundation of Twickenham Fine Ales and the resurgence in small breweries starting up throughout London. The breakdown in the tied estate and the introduction of guest ales in pubs has enabled the small brewer to gain distribution and access to consumers. But this easy in and easy out distribution set up was Twickenham’s key challenge, as it was all too simple for pubs to try a new entrant and TFA could quickly find itself back out of distribution. The task was to get Twickenham back in and establish itself as a permanent fixture at the bar.

Problem

The brief was clear, give the Twickenham Fine Ales brand a fresh visual look that would:
•Capture the enduring passion for making great tasting beer with traditional ingredients in the traditional way where the hops are hero
•Tell the story for each beer in the range
•Stand loud and proud at the point of purchase – the pub
Give each beer a clear pr oduct position

Approach

The design was created to give meaning to the brand line 'inspired by tradition', giving a more contemporary take to Twickenham's established range of beers and making a hero of the hops as the crown of the label. Every beer articulates its taste profile giving the drinker an anticipation of the flavours that were forthcoming.

The iconic arch shape and confident brand signature give Twickenham real 'choose me' standout at the bar.

TFA were keen to retain the existing brand elements in order to retain core loyal drinkers. To some, there is meaning in the icons, like the naked ladies statues in Twickenham, and the rugby, of course. This is not a new brand but one with heritage and a reputation for traditional brewing. The new design successfully evolved existing brand elements to create a real sense of relevance without throwing out any fundamental roots.

Result

New outlets gained in the 4 months post launch. A significant increase on the same period in the previous year. This is a remarkable transformation considering the poor view the trade had of the previous design.

As Ben Norman at the Brewery said, “some pubs had stated outright that the old branding wasn’t right for their outlets even though they loved the beer”.

What we had achieved was a branded look that pubs felt would be attractive to their customers and draw them into a product they knew to be top rate.

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